Windows 10 build 2004 vs. The China Xbox 360 receiver.

Or should it be “Windows 10 vs. the world?!?” build 2004 edition.

Back in April 2014 we published a little blog about this cheap Chinese receiver and how we managed to get it back online. Now, back then we were completely aware there was videos on YouTube, Forums, and other sources so such an article was nothing new even back then. As an end-user we found ourselves downloading from garbage share sites that only lead to either misleading links or infected files. It was at this time we used out blogging capabilities and power to make an official tutorial along with all software sources in one place. 190k downloads later, Yeah, we call it a success.

Fast forward to May of 2020, suddenly we were getting rained upon by users which were apart of the Microsoft partner program saying that the build 2004 version of Windows 10 disables their China Receiver. Common sense would be to direct those energies towards Microsoft and maybe they would fix the issue.

It appears that’s simply not the case. Read on if you wish to listen to my diatribe of corporate hate.

betamax video tape - S-Config.ComVideo tutorial fallback mirrors:

In case you have no-script enabled or for some reason cannot see the title video on this website. We have provided direct links for these videos.

  • WebM VP9 – Link – Apple Safari and IOS users may need to download VLC to make WebM work. Otherwise, this is the newest standard of web-streaming.
  • OGV – Link – The fallback codec for older PC’s and Linux USB stick OS’s. 1st generation web video streaming based on Ogg-Vorbis encoding.


And so the 2004 build update trashes my China Xbox Receiver drivers!

I originally thought the worst. That Microsoft was basically doing everything they could to kick the Xbox 360 product line. A line which is not old enough to get a learner permit and drive in certain parts of the United States at 15 years of age. Brutally put it into the dirt with the hardest planned obsolescence program that was only seen from Microsoft during the Original Xbox. However, if you start googling “Windows 10 build 2004 unknown device” you suddenly find yourself in the company of other users then just a cheap-ass Chinese knock-off product. Users with wi-fi adapters, video cards all getting the same issue.

Which at this point of realization it may not be Malice that Microsoft was going for but straight up incompetence. That instead of including the entire driver-tree into their kernel they simply ‘skipped’ a few libraries .¬† Especially if you have to choose which driver to use! Or perhaps it’s not incompetence. That Microsoft views older hardware as a security threat and must be eliminated. To wipe the playing field as it were of hardware so they don’t have to constantly see a report from it similar to how Microsoft made a fake ADB driver for the Ouya console.

Combine this with Microsoft discontinuing support for Windows 7 and it does feel like they’re corralling all of their end-users into a miserable situation. Where else would you go for the latest gaming experience? Linux? Mac? I suppose if everyone had a backbone and left for one of those operating systems then yes. The gaming community just doesn’t have that kind of fortitude.

The problem.

Windows Build 2004 complete.

As of June 02, 2020 most of my PC’s have not gone to build 2004, most are still sitting at 1908. However, the problem is a lot of people are making the jump by joining the microsoft partner program and getting the latest build of Windows 10 thinking it will be bigger and better then before. Because of 5, 10, 40 responses all of the screaming that my tutorial does not work. I went to work by making a garbage account on Microsoft and giving them all of the information of a computer that has nothing in order to get build 2004 installed.

The problem.

Unknown device hell.

It came as a shock to a lot of people which owned the Chinese adapter that their device is now rendered as an unknown device. That even though the Hardware ID still shows present. Their driver is completely blown away.

reinstall the driver.. easy peasy right?

A lot of users simply went through my tutorial again on the Xbox 360 adapter driver installation. By choosing which driver to use for this unknown device.

Did it install?

Windows even gives you the rare fleeting hope that it installed successfully just like build 1908.

Failure of Windows build 2004

Then at the very end windows 10 build 2004 kicks you in the face and not only does not install the driver. but renders the entire device useless by loading nothing. which we suppose is ONE way to get windows to stop complaining about device issues! Simply render the device useless!

This is bullshit. Because Windows gives the user an option to go out and find the driver yourself. It in fact does not complain if its a different driver so long as it has its EV cert digital certificate valid. If device selection is now useless is Windows 2004 what the hell is the point Microsoft? This is flat out bad OS design.

The fix.

The problem is actually Microsoft’s own security. To get our controller back online we need to get rid of that security Microsoft has put in place between us the end-user and the OS. Now, we’re no Microsoft experts but it’s generally a bad idea to remove security features from your OS. but if it cripples the way you enjoy your computer then what’s the point of even having said computer or hardware? The Xbox 360 may be an old joystick but it’s still a very capable joystick where if someone whips one into a wall we would be more angry about the plaster hole in the wall then loosing a few bucks on a controller.

Windows power shell.

The first thing we are going to do is go into Windows power shell. Or you can type CMD to get to command prompt so long as in both cases you are in this command promt as an administrator. Otherwise these commands will not work.

type in the following.

bcdedit /set nointegritychecks on

it will respond with: The operation completed successfully

bcdedit /set testsigning on

Note: If the test signing command responds with:

an error occured setting element data
The value protected Secure Boot policy cannot by modified or deleted.

Then that means you may have to go into the BIOS of your motherboard and disable such as feature in order for you to proceed any further in disabling test signing so that we can re-install the controller.Disabling Secure Boot within BIOS

The screen above is the ASRock BIOS that is on the test-station motherboard we have. Your BIOS screen may look very different but newer BIOS screens with UEFI functionality will have a “Security” tab and probably underneath that will be the “Secure Boot” flag that you will need to disable. After reboot a warning screen may come up asking the user to input a code to confirm disabling Secure Boot.

If safe boot is disabled then this command too shall respond with: The operation completed successfully.

Finally, the last thing you wish to type into shell is the following:

shutdown /r /o

to reboot into the windows recovery screen.

To undo the fix.

Simply type in the following:

bcdedit /set nointegritychecks off
bcdedit /set testsigning off

and reboot your windows so that integrity checking and testsigning is restored.

Just a note: There is a good possibility that by re-enabling the testsigning and integrity checking that your OS will detect the unsigned driver and kick it right back out of your system.

Disable that watermark:

What we’ve done in the past with XBCD for getting old-school XBOX controllers working also applies here. I’ll often just leave my OS in testsigning mode. Because fuck it I know what kind of drivers we’re loading on our OS. To get rid of that pesky splash screen at the bottom you can simply run the uwd.exe file that we just included into the chinaxbox.7z file as of 06/11/2020. That should remove the splash screen and keep test signing disabled indefinitely.

Now I’m sure I will get some Microsoft fanboy saying that we shouldn’t be keeping our OS’es in test signing mode to which I would have to respond with:

What choice to you leave us? You’ve locked the user out from selecting their own software! -S

Windows recovery.

As this isn’t our first blog article talking about removing security in order to get legacy hardware going we’ll take the documentation for the XBCD and just place it here.

Windows 10 - Advanced - Choose Options. If you held down the shift key and pressed that restart button correctly you will be presented with a menu of something like what is above. Select Troubleshoot. Windows 10 - Advanced - Choose Advanced Options. Select Advanced options. Windows 10 - Advanced - Choose startup settings. Select Start-Up Settings. Windows 10 - Advanced - Restart the Computer. Finally Select the “Restart” button and the computer will go into boot selection mode. Windows 10 - Advanced - Disable Signature Enforcement. You will not have a mouse in this mode. simply pressing the 7 key will be enough for the OS to reboot once more allowing you to finally be in the mode that we want to install the driver. It should also be noted that manually disabling driver signature enforcement is only good for one reboot versus the script or command-line method which is a more permanent approach towards disabling signature enforcement. If you only choose the manual method of disabling integrity checking then the next time you need to install a driver you will have to go through the manual process again.

Reboot the OS.

Now would be a good time to go grab some software.

Direct download:

This site prides itself on being the one-stop blog for everything you could need in a guide. However, as our usual disclaimer, you should always run a virus checker over any executable you get from a third party site including my own. Do not trust anything unless it comes from the source manufacturer. We will keep things clean as long as the site owner is alive but you may never know! Also, note that to preserve file space and for simplicity’s sake, all versions have been compressed into a single solid 7-Zip file. You may use WinRAR or 7-Zip to extract the files in this archive: Download softwareThis archive which is approximately 8Mb in size contains both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions of the Xbox 360 receiver driver. Click here to download the archive or click on the icon to the right of this paragraph to begin. Links will continue to be provided here in the event the company discontinues support.

Extract files:

7-zip extraction and folders.The first thing you will want to do is get a copy of WinRAR or 7-Zip. Any package that is capable of extracting 7-zip files. In this tutorial, we shall extract it to C:\chinaxbox\ . You can extract it anywhere you like just keep a note as to where you extracted these files while reading this tutorial.

Notes about the archive:

In the following example above we will be extracting everything in the C:\chinaxbox\ folder. This archive contains the following files:

  • Xbox360_32Eng – This is the 32-bit version of the Xbox Driver for those working with Windows 7 32-bit, Windows 8 32-bit, and finally Windows 10 32-bit.
  • Xbox360_64Eng – This is the 64-bit version of the Xbox Driver for those working with Windows 7 64-bit, Windows 8 64-bit, and finally Windows 10 64-bit.
  • Xbox360_Mod_XP – This version is made specifically for Windows XP 32/64 bit and Windows 7 32/64. Windows XP Tutorial listed here.
  • uwd.exe – this executable is copied over from the XBCD article. It’s responcible for disabling the watermarks so you can keep your windows box in testsigning mode without showing it.

Lets begin.

The directory we’re going to focus on in this for the Windows 10 build 2004 problem is the Xbox360_Mod_XP because windows XP cannot have a drivers forced onto the operating system. The drivers needed the .inf file changed to the exact device number in order for the driver to install. Well, that’s exactly what is happening in Windows 10 build 2004! When we try to specify a driver it fails. but if the inf already has the device ID (like the original Microsoft gaming receiver dongle) it succeeds. Unfortunately since we have changed the information in that INF file. The certification is lost which is why we had to disable test signing.

Browse for drivers in device manager.

Lets dive back into device manager. Right-click on our unknown device which is our China xbox receiver and click on update driver. Then, click the box for “Browse my computer for drivers.”

let me pick the driver to install.

Although we’re in the right folder you may not. so click on “let me pic from a list of available drivers on my computer.”

All devices and click next.

Show all devices is fine. Click the Next button to proceed.

Have disk button is important.

We really don’t care what it loads because we’re going to click on Have Disk…

Windows XP mod folder.

Now, we’re NOT going to go into the regular xbox folder. we’re going to go into the Xbox360_Mod_XP folder, THEN into windows 7 and finally press the Open button.

Xbox XP Mod full path.

If you extracted the 7-zip folder onto your C: drive the path should look something like this. Diving into the XP-Mod folder with the altered INF file. Click OK to proceed.

Driver Found.

Since the INF file locked onto the driver there is no selection here unlike the original Xbox 360 china receiver tutorial. so click next to continue.

Windows Securiy Warning.

If you get a windows security warning like this one. Then this is actually a very good sign. It means that since signature enforcement is disabled and test signing is on this window is the final precaution to keep you the end-user from installing a driver that could cripple your OS. Since we know what we’re doing… Kinda… Click Install this driver software anyways.

Manual XP MOD installation successful.

If everything goes according to plan you should have a non-digitally signed xbox receiver driver installed into windows 10 build 2004 and can now resume your gaming experience.

tampered device.

If you get an error “The has for the file is not present in the specified catalog file. The files is likely corrupt or victim of tampering”

That’s true! WE tampered with the INF file to make sure the vendor and product ID point to the Chinese receiver! But this error is due to testsigning not being turned on and further diagnostics must be done to your windows 10 build 2004 SO to determine why you cannot enable test signing and disable integrity checking. This could be due to your PC being stuck in a Secure Boot policy. Or an advanced firewall and/or sandbox software preventing direct access to the OS in this manner.

Final thoughts.

Xbox redirected.

As time marches onward. Microsoft tries to replace webpage after webpage with Xbox One promotion items to entice legacy owners to give up and buy a controller. That your 15 year old controller that you’ve used to beat countless of games is somehow useless in 2020 and that you MUST buy something new or get destroyed in a random windows update. While we find this attitude to be annoying as hell. It’s still not going to let us give up on the 10+ xbox controllers that we have in a case within our house.

They are still valid to play upon and they make excellent party controllers. Given the cost of an Xbox 360 controller where you can find them at thrift store for a few bucks. You don’t even feel bad if it gets dropped or crushed unlike the 60+ dollar controllers above. Because of the 2.4Ghz system the latency for us was almost non-existent which helped as along during our days playing with Android set-top boxes to which it still does with the Nvidia Shield.

Microsoft like many of the mega corps love to spout out this idealistic image that they are a green energy company while in the same breath throwing generations of plastic right into the landfill. plastic which if given to the right gamers will still enjoy despite the fact that these things are going on 15+ years old.

Anyhow, we hope that you found this updates article about Windows 10 build 2004 useful. and until next time.

May server protect you.

+++END OF LINE.

44 thoughts on “Windows 10 build 2004 vs. The China Xbox 360 receiver.

  1. Good, a pleasure to greet you. First of all thank you very much for your contribution. I have the following problem, in device manager it is OK. The receiver is OK. The problem I have is that the joistick connects to the receiver and immediately disconnects.
    Do you have any idea what it could be?
    Thank you!

    Reply
  2. I found this solution. It worked for me. Only a couple of minutes of work and you don’t have to disable any security options:

    Reply
  3. Awesome, this works for me!

    Question, If I roll back, will the driver really stop working?

    I noticed that Riot Vanguard doesnt work anymore because of this I think!

    Reply
    • I can’t comment about individual games. But rolling back to 1908 will allow you to actually choose your driver instead of working with unsigned drivers.

      Reply
  4. Great guide, got it working after a few hours of hassle.
    The 2004 version thing is really annoying!

    One thing im worried about though is can this increase the risk of malware?

    Reply
    • In theory? Yes. Malware that relies on kernel level driver installations could potentially effect your system.

      That being said. Most users who are online should have some sort of virus checker which stops such installations from even happening.

      Anyhow, sorry to hear that it took hours.. but glad you got it sorted out.

      Take care and happy gaming.

      Reply
  5. You, sir are a god damned legend! I literally thought I was losing my mind. My initial thought was that my mobo was failing or losing support, but no, Microsoft is the dirty beast.

    The receiver still worked on my raspberry pi, linux, and other Windows 10 machine (previous build), and I could not for my life find anything about it while searching for hours… I was truly stumped.

    Thank you for your detailed write-up and sharing in the frustration.

    Cheers!

    Reply
  6. So this is driving me nuts. I have a x360 Hori Fightstick. Its a Real arcade pro VX. Worked perfectly fine before the 2004 update. It used the basic xbox 360 controller driver xusb22.sys. I tried this fix hoping one of the drivers would work but I am still getting the same question mark in device manager. The xbox ring blinks twice and never goes to player one on the controller. Anything that can be done or I can try? Its wired BTW. Thank you very much patiently awaiting a response before I rollback.

    Reply
    • Although slightly outside the scope of this thread as it’s a wired controller. What you may need to do is similar to what some have done with later generation Chinese controllers and modify your INF file.

      In particular you will need to go to line 60 in the xusb21.inf file where it says:

      %XUSB21.DeviceName.Wired%=CC_Install, USB\Vid_045E&Pid_028E

      and add another line with the following:

      %XUSB21.DeviceName.Wired%=CC_Install, USB\Vid_24c6&Pid_5501

      also, repeat the following steps above at line 70 which should cover all bases. both x86 and x64 bit drivers.

      I’m taking a big leap of faith that your Vendor ID is 24c6 and your Product ID is 5501 as that is what is being reported for the real arcade pro VX-SA and we do not have that kind of controller here to test out.

      Adding this line of code into the xusb21.inf will force your fight stick to be acknowledged as a xbox360 wired controller without user intervention.

      Reply
  7. Well, Than you very much for this tutorial, it’s been very helpful . But I still have an issue, my controller does not sync with the receiver. What Can I do?

    Reply
    • Well, there’s a lot of questions here.. such as does the receiver show in device manager? has the receiver worked before the 2004 build? have you tried this receiver on another laptop/desktop?

      Reply
  8. Wow!
    Thank you so much!

    Huge thanks not just for finding out how to iron out those bugs,
    but for documenting everything you learn/know in such an excellent way

    You blog/site is deffenetly on my bookmarks now

    Reply
  9. well hell yeah it works. you’re a genius. Thanks man. But I did some tweaking as I cannot make it work for the first time. By reading the comments I came with modifying the inf file with the hardware ID. Make changes and boom it works. You totally rocks!!.

    Reply
    • I will have to add the additional INF file since there appears to be different hardware ID’s kicking around out there. but glad to hear it’s working out for you! Thanks for checking out this blog!

      Reply
  10. When playing games from XBOX game Pass the 360 joypad is not detected (I tried on Streets of Rage 2, Metro Exodus). Additionally pressing the green X no longer brings up the Game Bar (perhaps a related issue). Other than XGP games, it works.

    Do you have any suggestions on making things detectable on game pass games?

    Thanks for doing making this fix – god’s work, and as you point out, stops plastic filling landfills needlessly.

    Reply
    • Unfortunately we do not have Xbox game pass. Most of the games we tried were from Good old Games and Steam. Outside of random forums about the game pass which talks of only supporting xbox one controllers. I find it hard to believe they are hardware locking controllers out of their marketplace.

      Reply
  11. Thank God for this web site. I have been looking all day for a way to fix this issue and I finally found it. Again thank you.

    Reply
  12. Thank you for the clear and effective instructions. I happened to discover the issue on the same day that I installed a new PCIe USB card. Naturally, I blamed the card for my non-working Xbox 360 receiver. I’m still a bit astonished that a Windows update caused the problem. But, it works again with your instructions (for now, at least).

    One small edit… you repeat the same commands in the “To undo the fix” section.

    Thanks again for the helpful info.

    Reply
    • Hello there!

      Thanks for the catch on the “undo the fix” section. It has not been revised in the blog article. Surprisingly it isn’t just knockoff xbox receivers that got hit with this but pretty much any piece of hardware that subbed drivers which was a common thing to do with older windows 7 hardware. Now, we’re hoping Microsoft patches this problem so this article can be filed into a state of obscurity. But until then. This will be nessecary.

      Thank you very much for checking out this blog and happy gaming yo!

      Reply
  13. Yes, I got my receiver just a month or two ago, so that may explain why my PID is different. I turned secure boot back on, and when I plugged in the receiver I had to re-install the driver, but it worked – I don’t mind re-installing the driver every time I plug it in, since I don’t remove the dongle very often. I also used your watermark disabler, so additional thanks for that. I’m the kind of person that likes to tinker with my computer, so I’ve modified my registry, BIOS, etc, in the past, but this was definitely the most complicated procedure I’ve ever attempted – Microsoft better fix this soon, because not everyone with a third party dongle is going to be able to figure this out, and a new round of MS boycotts will start!

    Reply
  14. I had to change the XP version of the xusb21.inf file to match my device ID, which ends in 02A9 (USB\VID_045E&PID_02A9). I replaced all instances of 0719 with 02A9 in the file. Now that it works, do I need to turn no integrity checks and test signing off again, or will that happen automatically when I restart? I’m planning on turning safe boot back on in the BIOS as well, hopefully the receiver will still work.

    You’re a gentleman, a scholar, & a saint. I’m eternally grateful that someone is willing to stand up to Microsoft to allow us to continue using their own products! I also have a Wii U Pro controller set up to use with my laptop, and it’s so much easier because the Wii U uses Bluetooth, but I’m glad I can still get some use out of my old 360 controller!

    Reply
    • Intersting, so a new PID is floating about out there.. I’ll have to make an additional .inf file for that and append it to the archive. Thank you very much for letting me know.

      You’re welcome to try turning back on secure boot. On some of the PC’s around the house the moment i turn testsigning off it kicks the driver right on out. Which is why to get rid of the annoying watermark i included the universal watermark removal tool into the archive too. Granted! keeping test signing on and secure boot off could render a PC victim some of the more ugly malware/randomware attacks out there. It effectively makes your Windows 10 box similar to windows 7 when it comes to accepting unknown driver sources. But I don’t see a way around it until/IF Microsoft either corrects it in another update patch.

      Thank you very much for checking out this blog! Happy gaming and server protect you!

      Reply
  15. So should I do bcdedit /set testsigning off after install my driver ? Because on desktop right corner says test mode and build numbers.

    Reply
    • I have revised the chinaxbox.7z file to include uwd.exe. It’s the same tool we Used for XBCD drivers for original xbox’s. it basically hides the watermark all together. I found out that sometimes temporarily disabling testsigning mode knocks the driver out again after reboot. So we just disable it for good.

      Reply
  16. Hi,
    Thank you for the very useful info!

    Unfortunately I get stuck at
    C:\WINDOWS\system32> bcdedit /set nointegretychecks off
    The element data type specified is not recognized, or does not apply to the
    specified entry.
    Run “bcdedit /?” for command line assistance.
    Element not found.

    What should I do in this case?

    Reply
    • Apologies for that. There was a type in the blog. It has been corrected now.

      bcdedit /set nointegritychecks on
      bcdedit /set testsigning on

      should be the proper commands to pass in windows 10.

      Reply

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